The Bookshelf

A bookstore that shows movies. A cinema that serves dinner. A resto-bar that launches books.

0 notes

ThisWeek@TheBookshelf

Monday, February 25 to Sunday March 3

"Always read stuff that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it." (P. J. O’Rourke)

*AT THE BOOKSTORE*


Girl Geek Dinner (Monday, 6:00. Hosted in the eBar.)

Passion Ignited: UX and Start-ups. Kym Ho and Tammy te Winkel will be talking about UX and the energy applied to working with startups, working with all the startup groups at VeloCity (U of W entrepreneurship program), and about working at Encircle. Register for the talk at Girl Geek Dinner.

Conversations on Hope (Monday, 7:30-9:00 p.m. Hosted in the eBar.)

A series of six Monday evenings guided by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone’s book Active Hope, facilitated by John Lawson and Barbara Susan Booth. See the Sacred Wisdom Centre for more information and to register.

These Just In!
A sampling of this week’s new arrivals.
-
Fiction
The Beautiful Mystery, by Louise Penny
The Long Earth, by Terry Pratchett & Stephen Baxter
The Nightmare, by Lars Kepler
River Swimmer, by Jim Harrison
-
Non-Fiction
The Wise Men, by Walter Isaacson and Evan Thomas
How Children Succeed, by Paul Tough
The Big Shift, by Darrell Bricker and John Ibbitson
RMS Titanic, by Hugh Brewster
The Woman Who Changed Her Brain, by Barbara Arrowsmith-Young
Faviken, by Magnus Nilsson
-
New in Paperback
Drop Dead Healthy, by A. J. Jacobs
Blue Nights, by Joan Didion
Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, by Chris Hedges & Joe Sacco
-
Bookshelf Reviews
The Chalice, by Nancy Bilyeau
The Antidote, by Oliver Burkeman
Back to Blood, by Tom Wolfe
 
*AT THE CINEMA*
CHASING ICE

Directed by Jeff Orlowski
USA 2012 | 74 minutes
Rated PG
Wed. 1:00
          What began as a photo essay project by global warming skeptic James Balog, commissioned in 2005 by National Geographic, turned into this incredible documentary that won the audience favourite award at Toronto’s 2012 Hot Docs film fest. The film follows Mr Balog and his intrepid team as they install video cameras in remote and often dangerous locations throughout the Arctic. The time-lapse photography that they gather months later is the final portion of the film and presents an eye-opening record of the drastic changes that have occurred (and continue to occur) in the northernmost regions of our planet. A chilling record of a warming planet. [Trailer]

A ROYAL AFFAIR (En kongelig affaere)

Directed by Nikolaj Arcel

Denmark/Sweden/Czech 2012 | 137 min

Rated 14A (sexual content)
Mon.-Thurs. 6:30
          In the late 1700s, Johann Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen) was a German doctor employed by the court of Denmark’s King Christian VII. Johann was a forward-thinking man committed to the social reforms sweeping the enlightened regions of Europe, while the childish king was controlled by courtiers and drawn to whores. Christian’s beautiful young Queen Caroline (recently imported from England) was drawn to the progressive ideas and passions of Johann. Together, they made real strides to change the backward and regressive laws governing the country. That is, until their passions led the jealous courtiers to accuse Johann of improper relations with the Queen. This excellent historical costume piece sizzles with drama and parallels to current social and political scenarios, where a small but powerful (1%?) group enacts laws that protect their own wealth at the expense of all others. Highly recommended. Danish with subtitles. [Trailer]

DJANGO UNCHAINED
Directed by Quentin Tarantino
USA 2012 | 165 minutes
Rated 18A (brutal violence, gory scenes,
disturbing content)
Mon.-Thurs. 9:15
          From the man who brought you Reservoir DogsPulp Fiction, and Kill Bill comes this unforgettable take on pre-abolition America. Wrapped in a cloak of historical accuracy, Quentin’s film is charged with liberal use of the N-word and, if not rivers, then at least babbling brooks and splashy ponds of blood, brought on by a truly over-the-top (truly American?) display of the right to bear arms. But hey, if you don’t get Tarantino, you won’t get this one either. If you do, sit back and bask in the sheer cinematic excesses of this in-your-face American auteur. [Trailer]


QUARTET
Directed by Dustin Hoffman
UK 2012 | 99 minutes
Rated PG (language may offend)
Fri. 6:45, Sat. 1:00 & 6:45, Sun. 2:00 & 4:30
          Who knows why Dustin Hoffman waited so long to direct his first feature, but Quartet proves worth the wait. Within the comfortable confines of Beecham House, a retirement home that caters exclusively to former singers and musicians, we meet Reggie (Tom Courtenay), Wilf (Billy Connolly), and Cissy (Patricia Collins), three-fourths of a former quartet of operatic singers. But the tranquility of Beecham House is broken with the arrival of Jean (Maggie Smith), the remaining member of the quartet and Reggie’s ex-wife, on the eve of their annual concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday. Combining fine music, quick-witted dialogue, and highly skilled veteran performers, Quartet is a fabulous folly of the operatic ravings of four fine diva(o)s. [Trailer]
ZERO DARK THIRTY
USA 2012 | 157 minutes
Directed by Kathryn Bigelow
Rated 14A (graphic violence, coarse language, disturbing content)
Fri.-Sat. 9:00, Sun. 7:00
          From the first female winner of an Oscar for Best Director (The Hurt Locker) comes this insider’s tale of Maya (Jessica Chastain), the woman who broke through al Qaeda subterfuge to find Osama Bin Laden. Again, Ms Bigelow proves her skill at portraying the human face of modern warfare. Zero Dark Thirty (code for the 12:30am raid on Bin Laden’s compound) explores the torturous routes taken by US forces and is not for the faint of heart. One of the best films of 2012, Zero Dark Thirty has divided critics and audiences alike. An engaging portrait of one woman’s persistence or an embedded glorification of tainted US foreign policy? That’s for you to decide, after having seen it. [Trailer]
See our monthly Cinema Calendar.

*AT THE EBAR*

Birds of Chicago and Oh Susanna (Thursday)
See Fortnight Music for more details.
Flashback Friday(Friday, $2 cover)
A retro 80s and 90s night featuring a full laser show and UV canon. The cover is waived for anyone wearing 80s and 90s clothing!
 
Coming Soon
Scarlett Jane (Tues., Mar. 5)
Part of the Birds on a Wire series of woman singer/songwriters.
 
Fred Eaglesmith(Thurs. Mar. 7)
The Canadian alternative country singer-songwriter comes to the eBar with his Travelling Steam Show.
*CHECK US OUT*

On the Web | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Tumblr
Bookshelf blogs: Bookstore | Cinema | eBar

Become a Bookshelf Member! Only $15 per year ($25.00 for a family) gets you savings on books and food, and $4.00 off movie admission.
The Bookshelf. 41 Quebec Street. Guelph, Ontario. 519-821-3311Queries@bookshelf.ca.

Filed under Bookshelf indie bookstore Independent bookstore cinema independent cinema Guelph Guelph events Chasing Ice Quartet Zero Dark Thirty The Royal Affair film

0 notes

ThisWeek@TheBookshelf

Monday, February 18 to Sunday, February 24

“I went to a bookstore and asked the saleswoman, ‘Where’s the self-help section?’ She said if she told me, it would defeat the purpose.” (George Carlin)

AT THE BOOKSTORE

Conversations on Hope (Monday, 7:30-9:00 p.m. Hosted in the eBar.)

     A series of six Monday evenings guided by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone’s book Active Hope, facilitated by John Lawson and Barbara Susan Booth. See the Sacred Wisdom Centre more information and to register.

These Just In!
A sampling of this week’s new arrivals.
Fiction
Ghostman, by Roger Hobbs
Finding Camlann, by Sean Pidgeon
Rebel Heart, by Moira Young
-
Non-Fiction
Signal and the Noise, by Nate Silver
The Future, by Al Gore
Fear, by Thich Nhat Hanhb
Escape from Camp 14, by Blaine Harden
Looking for Transwonderland, by Noo Saro-Wiwa
This is How, by Augusten Burroughs
-
New in Paperback
Attack of the Copula Spiders, by Douglas Glover
The World as It Is, by Chris Hedges
Everybody Has Everything, by Katrina Onstad
The Marriage Plot, by Jeffrey Eugenides
-
Bookshelf Reviews
The Blind Giant, by Nick Harkaway
The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern
AT THE CINEMA
Guelph Movie Club 

THE BIG LEBOWSKI
Directed by Joel and Ethan Coen
USA/UK 1998 | 116 minutes
Rated 14A (coarse language, graphic bowling)
Thurs. 9:00
      It’s been years since The Dude (It really tied the room together, man. Hey man, nice marmot!), Donny (What’s a nihilist?), Walter (Am I right or am I right? This is tournament play Smokey!), Jesus (Nobody F@#Ks with the Jesus), Maude, Bunny and that other Lebowski were on our screen. As we approach the 15th anniversary of its theatrical release (March 6, 1998), TBL was chosen as the film for the second gathering of the Guelph Movie Club. Or if you’re not really into that whole meeting thing, chill a Russian, twist a joint, and join us for a communal flashback. The Dude abides. To celebrate, there’ll be a special Thursday on White Russians at the eBar. [Trailer]

At the screening the March Guelph Movie Club pick, chosen by popular vote, will be announced, and you’ll have a chance to nominate films for the April screening. 

-
This Week’s Films
AMOUR
Directed by Michael Haneke
Austria/France/Germany 2012 | 127 min
Rated PG (mature theme)
Tues.-Thurs. 6:30
      Winner of the Palme d’Or at Cannes 2012 and now nominated for five Oscars including Best Picture, Director, Actress, Original Screenplay, and Foreign Language film, Amour is not to be missed. Mr Haneke places the entire film (save for one external scene) within the apartment of Anne (Emmanuelle Riva) and Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant), an elderly couple living in Paris. The routines of their domestic solitude are shaken when Anne suffers a minor stroke. Aged and ailing himself, Georges labours to care for his beloved wife while struggling to uphold her request that he never take her back to the hospital. This is a heart-wrenching yet liberating vision of life, love, and death. But don’t just take it from me:

“In Amour, these two actors show us what love is, what it really looks like, and what it may, at its most secret moments, demand.” Owen Gleiberman, Entertainment Weekly
“Michael Haneke’s Amour, a perfect film about intertwined lives, proceeds at its own pace, and breathes so deeply that it takes your own breath away.” Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal
“A masterpiece about life, death and everything in between.” Manohla Dargis, The New York Times
“In the history of movies about love, Amour shall last forever.” Mary Corliss, Time.
Highly Recommended. French with subtitles. [Trailer]
-

CHASING ICE
Directed by Jeff Orlowski
USA 2012 | 74 minutes
Rated PG
Tues.-Wed. 9:00, Sat.-Sun. 2:00

      What began as a photo essay project by global warming skeptic James Balog, commissioned in 2005 by National Geographic, turned into this incredible documentary that won the audience favourite award at Toronto’s 2012 Hot Docs film fest. The film follows Mr Balog and his intrepid team as they install video cameras in remote and often dangerous locations throughout the Arctic. The time-lapse photography that they gather months later is the final portion of the film and presents an eye-opening record of the drastic changes that have occurred (and continue to occur) in the northernmost regions of our planet. A chilling record of a warming planet. [Trailer]

A ROYAL AFFIAR (En kongelig affaere)
Directed by Nikolaj Arcel
Denmark/Sweden/Czech 2012 | 137 min
Rated 14A (sexual content)
Fri.-Sat. 6:30, Sun. 3:30
      In the late 1700s, Johann Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen) was a German doctor employed by the court of Denmark’s King Christian VII. Johann was a forward-thinking man committed to the social reforms sweeping the enlightened regions of Europe, while the childish king was controlled by courtiers and drawn to whores. Christian’s beautiful young Queen Caroline (recently imported from England) was drawn to the progressive ideas and passions of Johann. Together, they made real strides to change the backward and regressive laws governing the country. That is, until their passions led the jealous courtiers to accuse Johann of improper relations with the Queen. This excellent historical costume piece sizzles with drama and parallels to current social and political scenarios, where a small but powerful (1%?) group enacts laws that protect their own wealth at the expense of all others. Highly recommended. Danish with subtitles. [Trailer]
-

DJANGO UNCHAINED
Directed by Quentin Tarantino
USA 2012 | 165 minutes
Rated 18A (brutal violence, gory scenes,
disturbing content)
Fri.-Sat. 9:15, Sun. 6:30
      From the man who brought you 
Reservoir DogsPulp Fiction, and Kill Bill comes this unforgettable take on pre-abolition America. Wrapped in a cloak of historical accuracy, Quentin’s film is charged with liberal use of the N-word and, if not rivers, then at least babbling brooks and splashy ponds of blood, brought on by a truly over-the-top (truly American?) display of the right to bear arms. But hey, if you don’t get Tarantino, you won’t get this one either. If you do, sit back and bask in the sheer cinematic excesses of this in-your-face American auteur.[Trailer]

See our monthly Cinema Calendar.

AT THE EBAR
A live music night every second Tuesday featuring female singer/songwriters! This Tuesday, Robyn Dell’Unto.
 
The Walkervilles (Thursday)
Fortnight Music presents a night of rock-infused Motown, soul, and funk.
 
Flashback Friday(Friday, $2 cover)
A retro 80s and 90s night featuring a full laser show and UV canon. The cover is waived for anyone wearing 80s and 90s clothing!
 
Coming Soon
Birds of Chicago and O Susanna (Thurs., Feb. 28)
See Fortnight Music for more details.


CHECK US OUT

On the Web | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Tumblr
Bookshelf blogs: Bookstore | Cinema | eBar

Become a Bookshelf Member! Only $15 per year ($25.00 for a family) gets you savings on books and food, and $4.00 off movie admission.


The Bookshelf. 41 Quebec Street. Guelph, Ontario. 519-821-3311Queries@bookshelf.ca.

Filed under Bookshelf Guelph Guelph events indie bookstore Independent bookstore cinema film Chasnig Ice Amour music female musicians books good reads fiction non-fiction literature reading

0 notes

The 32nd Annual Guelph Organic Conference and Expo - on NOW at the University of Guelph’s University Centre, running from Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013 More info about the conference is here: http://www.guelphorganicconf.ca If you’re looking for literature on the subject, you know we have some.

The 32nd Annual Guelph Organic Conference and Expo - on NOW at the University of Guelph’s University Centre, running from Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013 More info about the conference is here: http://www.guelphorganicconf.ca If you’re looking for literature on the subject, you know we have some.

Filed under Guelph Organic Conference Guelph Guelph events University of Guelph organic UoG Bookshelf indie bookstore Independent bookstore literature food health growing farm trees seeds gardening

0 notes

ThisWeek@TheBookshelf

Monday, January 28 to Sunday, February 3

"A book commits suicide every time you watch a reality TV show." (Internet meme)

AT THE BOOKSTORE


Girl Geek Dinner
 (Monday at 6:00 p.m. Hosted in the eBar)
     Dr. Judi McQuaig speaks on intelligent tutoring systems. To register, go to Girl Geek Dinner Guelph.

Conversations on Hope (Monday, 7:30-9:00 p.m. Hosted in the eBar.)

     A series of six Monday evenings guided by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone’s book Active Hope, facilitated by John Lawson and Barbara Susan Booth. See the Sacred Wisdom Centre more information and to register.

These Just In!
A sampling of this week’s new arrivals.
*
Fiction
Kinsey and Me, by Sue Grafton
The Woman Who Died a Lot, by Jasper Fforde
Song of the Quark Beast, by Jasper Fforde
*
Non-Fiction
May I Be Happy, by Cyndi Lee
Straphanger, by Tara Grescoe
Thinking the Twentieth Century, by Tony Judt and Timothy Snyder
*
New in Paperback
February, by Lisa Moore
The Round House, by Louise Erdrich
Born Weird, by Andrew Kaufman
*
Bookshelf Reviews
Shadow and Bone, by Leigh BardugoThe Zenith, Duong Thu HuongMission to Paris, Alan Furst


AT THE CINEMA
-
Guelph Movie Club Screening
GHOSTBUSTERS (Thursday, 9:00)
Directed by Ivan Reitman
USA 1984 | 103 minutes Rated PG
          We’re starting a monthly series of popular movies that need to be shared in public, in a cinema. Who you gonna call? That’s right—Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, Dan Aykroyd, Sigourney Weaver, Rick Moranis, and Annie Potts…the Ghostbusters. Dress the part or come as you are. Door prizes, great movie, join us! [Trailer]
Be a part of choosing the movie for the March GMC screening! For more information, see our Cinema Blog.
-
This Week’s Films
-
QUARTET
Directed by Dustin Hoffman

UK 2012 | 99 minutes
Rated PG (language may offend)
Mon. 6:30, Tues. 8:30, Wed. 1:00 & 6:30, Thurs.- Sat. 6:30, Sun. 4:30
          Who knows why Dustin Hoffman waited so long to direct his first feature, but Quartet proves worth the wait. Within the comfortable confines of Beecham House, a retirement home that caters exclusively to former singers and musicians, we meet Reggie (Tom Courtenay), Wilf (Billy Connolly), and Cissy (Patricia Collins), three-fourths of a former quartet of operatic singers. But the tranquility of Beecham House is broken with the arrival of Jean (Maggie Smith), the remaining member of the quartet and Reggie’s ex-wife, on the eve of their annual concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday.Combining fine music, quick-witted dialogue, and highly skilled veteran performers, Quartet is a fabulous folly of the operatic ravings of four fine diva(o)s. [Trailer]
-
THE MASTER
Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson
USA 2012 | 137 minutes
Rated 14A (nudity, sexual content, coarse language)
Mon. 8:30, Wed. 8:30
          PT Anderson’s long-awaited sixth feature continues his thematic exploration of America’s power struggle between business and religious fervour, harshly demanding father figures and the damaged, dysfunctional young males caught in the midst. Philip Seymour Hoffman plays Lancaster Dodd, the charismatic leader of a quasi-religious/philosophical group who adopts Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), a sailor, who has drunkenly drifted from one mishap to another following his post-WWII military discharge. Aficionados of Mr Anderson’s singular cinematic vision will revel in his latest work, which is much-heralded by movie critics around the world. Huge, AAActorly performances from Mssrs Phoenix and Seymour Hoffman are balanced by a superbly supporting Amy Adams. The Master is a visually opulent feast and this year’s behemoth, head-scratching, movie of ideas. Considered by many critics to be one of the best films of 2012 and perhaps worth a second look. [Trailer]

-
DOCTORED
Directed by Bobby Sheehan
USA 2012 | 100 minutes
Tues. 6:30

          Presented by the Family Chiropractic Centre in Guelph, Doctored sets out to explore the divide between alternative health treatments like chiropractics, nutritional supplements, and acupuncture and the multi-billion dollar medical industry. As the filmmakers attest, “We learn about the influencers, the people you never see but whose job it is to turn you into a compliant, pill popping, revenue generation unit, and the Medical Monopoly, who spends millions a year attacking, ridiculing, and trying to discredit these natural therapies.” All tickets $10.00, with proceeds going to Habitat for Humanity. For more info and to buy advance tickets contact FCC at 519-837-1234.
-
SKYFALL
Directed by Sam Mendes
UK/USA 2012 | 143 minutes
Rated PG (violence)
Fri. 8:30, Sat.-Sun. 1:30
          The most recent film in the storied Bond franchise features Daniel Craig for the third time in the lead role, Judi Dench, Naomie Harris, Albert Finney, Javier Bardem as the most nefarious of nasty, no-good villains, a great theme song (by Adele), and a kick-ass opening segment worth the price of admission alone. But then you get an additional two hours of action and intrigue worthy of a Bond story and begging for a cinema viewing. [Trailer]
-

THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER
Directed by Stephen Chbosky 
USA 2012 | 103 minutes
Rated 14A (disturbing content, 
substance use)
Sat. 9:00, Sun. 7:00

          Based on the bestselling novel set in Pittsburgh, early 1990s (and the soundtrack rings true to that era), The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a teen drama that is both timeless and timely. Alone and depressed in the aftermath of his best friend’s suicide, Charlie (Logan Lerman) enters his first year of high school and is introduced through English class to the titans of American youth literature from Fitzgerald to Kerouac. He is also adopted socially by fellow outsiders Sam (Emma Watson) and Patrick (Ezra Miller). Together, these self-dubbed misfits weave their way through tough personal issues, the perils of adolescence, and the parade of bullies who line the school hallways. While the jocks are toughing it out on the gridiron this Super Bowl weekend, come join Charlie, Sam and Patrick for our wallflower celebrations. [Trailer]

A great bargain: Dinner and a Movie for only $23.00 ($20.00 for members) plus tax! Phone 519-821-3311 to reserve.
See our monthly Cinema Calendar.


AT THE EBAR

Kazoo Show (Thursday)
Julie Doiron, Rich Burnett/Construction & Destruction
Flashback Friday(Friday, $2 cover)
A retro 80s and 90s night featuring a full laser show and UV canon. The cover is waived for anyone wearing 80s and 90s clothing!
 
Coming Soon
JFB (Sat. Feb. 9)
The 2 x UK DMC Champion offers the best in turntabling.

Valentine’s Day @ the eBar
 (Thurs. Feb. 14)
Live music with Ben Caplan. For an all-in-one special evening, we will be offering either Dinner and a Movie or Dinner and Ben Caplan’s show for $23/person ($20 for Bookshelf members) during the second dinner sitting in the Green Room.

Terrence Parker (Sun. Feb. 17)
House music at its best.
Birds on a Wire(Starting Tues. Feb. 19)
A live music night every second Tuesday featuring female singer/songwriters! Feb. 19 features Robyn Dell’Unto.


CHECK US OUT

On the Web | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Tumblr
Bookshelf blogs: Bookstore | Cinema | eBar

Become a Bookshelf Member! Only $15 per year ($25.00 for a family) gets you savings on books and food, and $4.00 off movie admission.

To subscribe to this list, just send an email to subscribe@bookshelf.ca

The Bookshelf. 41 Quebec Street. Guelph, Ontario. 519-821-3311. Queries@bookshelf.ca.

Filed under Guelph Guelph events Bookshelf books literature canadian reading writing fiction non-fiction good reads indie bookstore Independent bookstore independent cinema Ghostbusters ebar Ben Caplan Terrence Parker house music Kazoo

0 notes

ThisWeek@TheBookshelf

Monday, January 21 to Sunday, January 27

"In the case of good books, the point is to see not how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

AT THE BOOKSTORE


Conversations on Hope (Starting Monday at 7:30-9:00 p.m. Hosted in the eBar.)

A series of six Monday evenings guided by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone’s book Active Hope, facilitated by John Lawson and Barbara Susan Booth. See the Sacred Wisdom Centre more information and to register.

Vocamus Press Launch(Saturday, 7-10 p.m. Hosted in the eBar.)

An evening featuring readings from writers from Guelph and surrounding area, interspersed with a healthy amount of mingling, chatting, and drinking.


The C Word: It’s Time to Talk About Capitalism (Sunday, 1-3 p.m. Hosted in the cinema.)
A discussion with Leo Panitch and Sam Gindin, the authors of The Making of Global Capitalism.

These Just In!
A sampling of this week’s new arrivals.
Fiction
The Chemistry of Tears, by Peter Carey
Philida, by Andre Brink
The Empty Glass, by J. I. Baker
See also the amazing video.
Non-Fiction
Archetypes, by Caroline Myss
Subliminal, by Leonard Mlodinow
The Secret Race, by Tyler Hamilton and Daniel Coyle
Letters to My Daughter, by Fawzia Koofi
When Women Were Birds, by Terry Tempest Williams
New in Paperback
Gay Dwarves of America, by Anne Fleming
The Dead Are More Visible, by Steven Heighton
Love and the Mess We’re In, by Stephen Marche
Magnified World, by Grace O’Connell
Bookshelf Reviews
Before the Poison, by Peter Robinson
Buddhaland Brooklyn, by Richard C. Morais
That Summer in Paris, by Morley Callaghan
New Music

Check out our nicely-curated selection of vinyl and CDs. For sound samples of the albums below, see our Tumblr page.
Jake Bugg, self-titled
Alicia Keys, Girl on Fire
Serena Ryder, Harmony
Rodriguez, Searching for Sugarman Soundtrack
Grimes, Visions
Emeli Sande, Our Version of Events


AT THE CINEMA

HYDE PARK ON HUDSON
Directed by Roger Michel
UK 2012 | 95 minutes
Rated PG (mature theme)
Mon.-Thurs. 6:30
          Hyde Park on Hudson takes us to the summer home of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1939, during his third consecutive term as US President and on the eve of World War II. Britain’s King George VI (the charming stammerer profiled in The King’s Speech) and his wife Elizabeth make a visit to inquire about America’s willingness to help if the growing threats of war in Europe become a reality. FDR is played with presidential but impish glee by Bill Murray, who brings a paternal insouciance and relaxed manner to the role. He puts those around him at ease and brings a casual levity to the film’s many tense or socially awkward moments. Laura Linney is impeccable (again!) as FDR’s distant cousin Daisy. She offers an everywoman’s perspective on the world of the rich and powerful, and provides a glimpse into FDR’s notorious philandering. Hyde Park on Hudson is an entertaining glimpse into these important lives during a crucial time in history. [Trailer]

RUST AND BONE (De rouille et d’os)
Directed by Jacques Audiard
France/Belgium 2012 | 120 minutes
Rated 18A (sexual content, graphic violence)
Mon.-Thurs. 8:30
          Ali (Matthias Schoenaerts) is a single parent and a drifter with dreams of becoming a mixed martial arts fighter. Stephanie (Marion Cotillard) works with killer whales at a marine amusement park. Their lives collide after Stephanie suffers a tragic accident at work. Like M Audiard’s previous film, Un Prophet, Rust and Bone is another intense, at times harshly violent, character study that has garnered much critical praise and record-setting box office in France. As Cameron Bailey wrote in TIFF 2012, “Echoing the film’s vivid contrast of brutality and tenderness…Schoenaerts is that rare combination of imposing presence and vulnerability, while Cotillard gives a bold performance, emotionally raw and achingly soulful.” While not necessarily for the casual date-movie filmgoer, Rust and Bone should be considered a must-see for serious cineastes. French with subtitles. 
[Trailer]

QUARTET
Directed by Dustin Hoffman

UK 2012 | 99 minutes
Rated PG (language may offend)
Fri.-Sat. 6:30, Sun. 3:30
          Who knows why Dustin Hoffman waited so long to direct his first feature, but Quartet proves worth the wait. Within the comfortable confines of Beecham House, a retirement home that caters exclusively to former singers and musicians, we meet Reggie (Tom Courtenay), Wilf (Billy Connolly), and Cissy (Patricia Collins), three-fourths of a former quartet of operatic singers. But the tranquility of Beecham House is broken with the arrival of Jean (Maggie Smith), the remaining member of the quartet and Reggie’s ex-wife, on the eve of their annual concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday.Combining fine music, quick-witted dialogue, and highly skilled veteran performers, Quartet is a fabulous folly of the operatic ravings of four fine diva(o)s. [Trailer]

THE INTOUCHABLES
Directed by Olivier Nakache
and Eric Toledano
France 2012 | 112 minutes
Rated 14A (coarse language)
Fri. 9:00, Sat. 1:30

          François Cluzet stars as the aristocratic Philippe, a quadriplegic who hires Driss (César-winning Best Actor Omar Sy), an unemployed street hustler, to be his full-time caregiver. While his friends and staff worry for his safety and sanity, Philippe and Driss, apparently complete opposites, develop an unlikely but intense bond of friendship. This popular, heart-warming comedy returns to The Bookshelf by overwhelming demand. Do yourself a favour and join us for The Intouchables. French with subtitles. [Trailer]

HEART AT NIGHT: DAVID EARLE IN GUELPH
Directed by Vaughn Barclay
Canada 2012 | 53 minutes
Sat. 4:00
          This documentary profiles the work and ongoing cultural legacy of David Earle, one of Canada’s most beloved choreographers and a pioneer in modern dance. Recorded during the Dancetheatre David Earle 2009 Summer Intensive and through 2010, the film unfolds a portrait of Earle as artist, teacher, and mentor during the DtDE Studio’s first decade in Guelph. Interwoven performance and rehearsal footage reveals the prolific eclecticism of Earle’s creation over many decades and a compelling sense of the human experience of dance as primal and passionate communication. 
All seats $10.00. 

THE MASTER
Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson
USA 2012 | 137 minutes
Rated 14A (nudity, sexual content, coarse language)
Sat. 9:00, Sun. 7:00

          PT Anderson’s long-awaited sixth feature continues his thematic exploration of America’s power struggle between business and religious fervour, harshly demanding father figures and the damaged, dysfunctional young males caught in the midst. Philip Seymour Hoffman plays Lancaster Dodd, the charismatic leader of a quasi-religious/philosophical group who adopts Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), a sailor, who has drunkenly drifted from one mishap to another following his post-WWII military discharge. Aficionados of Mr Anderson’s singular cinematic vision will revel in his latest work, which is much-heralded by movie critics around the world. Huge, AAActorly performances from Mssrs Phoenix and Seymour Hoffman are balanced by a superbly supporting Amy Adams. The Master is a visually opulent feast and this year’s behemoth, head-scratching, movie of ideas. Considered by many critics to be one of the best films of 2012 and perhaps worth a second look. [Trailer]

A great bargain: Dinner and a Movie for only $23.00 ($20.00 for members) plus tax! Phone 519-821-3311 to reserve.
See our monthly Cinema Calendar.


AT THE EBAR

Fortnight Show (Wednesday)
Alanna Gurr, Ptarmigan, Lonnie in the Garden

Corin Raymond and the Sundowners(Thursday, 10:00 p.m. $18/20; $12 students)
The noted country/folk/roots musician visits Guelph. “Corin Raymond is a storyteller who by the end of the night you’ll have known all your life.” (Brad Wheeler, Globe and Mail)
Flashback Friday(Friday, $2 cover)
A retro 80s and 90s night featuring a full laser show and UV canon. The cover is waived for anyone wearing 80s and 90s clothing!

Coming Soon

Kazoo Show (Wed. Jan. 31)
Julie Doiron, Rich Burnett/Construction & Destruction

Birds on a Wire(Starting Tues. Feb. 19)
A live music night every second Tuesday featuring female singer/songwriters! Feb. 19 features Robyn Dell’Unto.


CHECK US OUT
On the Web | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Tumblr
Bookshelf blogs: Bookstore | Cinema | eBar

Become a Bookshelf Member! Only $15 per year ($25.00 for a family) gets you savings on books and food, and $4.00 off movie admission.

To subscribe to this list, just send an email to subscribe@bookshelf.ca

The Bookshelf. 41 Quebec Street. Guelph, Ontario. 519-821-3311. Queries@bookshelf.ca.

Filed under Guelph Guelph events Bookshelf books reading writing literature good reads fiction non-fiction indie bookstore Independent bookstore cinema film Rust and Bone hyde park on hudson Rodriguez Searching for Sugar Man capitalism Joanna Macy Chris Johnstone eBar The Master Fortnight music Alanna Gurr Corin Raymond

0 notes

Exciting New Music CDs Available at the Bookshelf!

Happy New Year, Music Fans!!

The Bookshelf’s music section is ever-evolving, and features a selection of classic rock, jazz and country selections as well as some incredible up-and-coming talent, both local and international.

Some awesome new artists currently available include:

Jake Bugg’s self-titled debut, featuring "Lightning Bolt"

British sensation Emeli Sande’s Our Version of Events, featuring "Next to Me"

The White Buffalo’s first LP Once Upon a Time in the West, featuring "Wish It Was True"

And, if you haven’t checked out these amazing musicians yet, you’ll want to hear their newest releases:

Canadian artist Grimes’ Visions, featuring "Oblivion"

Rodriguez’s Searching for Sugarman Soundtrack, from the Academy award- nominated documentary, featuring "Cause"

Serena Ryder’s Harmony, featuring "Stompa"

Alicia Keys’ Girl on Fire, featuring the hit title track

Come browse our excellent, well-curated selection of sounds! Special orders are always welcome.